rkt stop

Given a list of pod UUIDs, rkt stop will shut them down, for the shipped stage1 images, this means:

  • default systemd-nspawn stage1: the apps in the pod receive a TERM signal and, after a timeout, a KILL signal.
  • kvm stage1: the virtual machine is shut down with systemctl halt.
  • rkt fly stage1: the app receives a TERM signal.

The --force flag will stop a pod forcibly, that is:

  • default systemd-nspawn stage1: the container is killed.
  • kvm stage1: the lkvm process receives a KILL signal.
  • rkt fly stage1: the app receives a KILL signal.
# rkt stop 387fc8eb cbbf5c01
"387fc8eb-eabd-4e77-b080-d8c0001eb50c"
"cbbf5c01-dd52-4ccc-a1e0-cfd8f1e88418"
# rkt stop --force 93e516b0
"93e516b0-e84b-40cf-a45b-531b14dfcce2"

The --uuid-file flag may be used to pass a text file with UUID to stop command. This can be paired with --uuid-file-save flag to stop pods by name:

rkt run --uuid-file-save=/run/rkt-uuids/mypod ...
rkt stop --uuid-file=/run/rkt-uuids/mypod

Other ways to stop a rkt pod

If you started rkt as a systemd service, you can stop the pod with systemctl stop.

If you started rkt interactively:

  • For a stage1 with systemd-nspawn, you can stop the pod by pressing ^] three times within 5 seconds. If you're using systemd on the host, you can also use machinectl with the poweroff or terminate subcommand.
  • For a stage1 with kvm, you can stop the pod by pressing Ctrl+A and then x.